THE DISEASE BURDEN

“I am a prime example of the way kidney disease strikes silently,” Sean Elliot

Despite being one of the top ten common claimers of life,chronic kidney disease still struggles to receive visibility in Kenya.It is worthwhile to note hat the poverty of statistical data has not stopped the Global Burden of Disease (2015) study from ruling that5-10 million people die annually due to kidney disease.”The common lack of awareness and frequently poor access to laboratory services ,such numbers underestimate the true burden posed by kidney disease,”concludes WHO.

Mine is not to bore you with lengthy academic papers.Let us make that a little digestible to us.When we talk of disease burden especially with End stage renal disease,we need to be awake to some of the struggles of daily living in the life of a patient.

What I have had to grapple with and most renal nurses I am sure is the constant poly-pharmacy. A renal patient of dialysis will most likely have medicine to lower their Phosphorous level while adding their Calcium level,medicine to add the level of blood,medicine to lower the blood pressure,medicine to regulate blood sugar ,medicine for the heart,medicine for nerves and the list can’t be exhausted.The problem is the utter intimidating nature of all these tablets one person is expected to take and remember to take.

It is overwhelming even to think about it. I am a nurse and the idea of swallowing medication or receiving it in any other form makes me cringe. The families are faced with the constant fact of buying these drugs month in month out and it is not a wonder to see most of our patients going without them.

Just like the infamous American heath system,the Kenyan one is perpetually making a patient choose between treatment and food. Between taking children to school and proper healthcare.This should never be the case in a country that indeed loves her people.

The good old NHIF can and should pay for these essential drugs but the drugs are always conveniently missing from the hospital pharmacy.Maybe I need to say it again. There is a mismatched relationship between low income status in Kenya and the prevalence of end stage renal disease. Perhaps because the rich are able to deter the progression of the illness at its early stages.

Perhaps because the haves can access better and timely medical care as compared to the have nots. It has become a death wish to be below the poverty line in Kenya.It is a rich man’s country.

I can’t stop the activist in me now,can I?

Let us go back to our topic…

I implore you as #TeamPhoenix to be so kind as to check on those among us with kidney disease and are on dialysis. They too are part of this daunting team. It is financially and emotionally exhausting. This is compounded by the fact that they may not ask for your help for fear of being a constant bother. Most die in silence if not saying all is well.

All is not well.It is not when someone has to prepare two meals at every mealtime. One for the rest of the family and one for the patient. It is especially difficult when that meal is not easy to come by.

Yet they have drugs to buy and laboratory tests to take and a dialysis session to attend to.

That is where I advocate for a renal counselors and social services care contact persons in every renal unit.We need a safe place where the caregivers and the patients can express their challenges.The nephrology nurses can only do so many dialysis sessions.We need help. I believe there is help out there. If not for anything else,for availability of all these medicines without which the quality and length of time of patients on dialysis is reduced. Let us stop unnecessary and premature deaths.

And to you my #TeamPhoenix,do not expect a sufferer of kidney disease to ask you for help. Offer it anyway. Please help. That is the only way we can beat the burden of end stage renal disease. It does not matter what you do. Probably buy a week supply of drugs, maybe find out their dietary needs and provide that for a day or two, there is something all of us can do.

This Nephrology nurse will keep writing to tell you about it.

As always, having you read is my honor.

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